Counterterrorism and challenges to human rights: Justifying drones and targeted killing as acts of self-defence

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (peer-reviewed)peer-review

Abstract

The chapter considers the US government’s justifications of counterterrorism measures with a particular focus on the use drones for targeted killings. In line with the book’s overall framing, the US can be seen as ejecting traditional understandings of some fundamental human rights principles in favour of co-opted ideas of group rights to security. Particularly the way in which drones are being used in counterterrorism campaigns raises a number of important questions related to the laws of armed conflict, such as proportionality and the principle of distinction. The chapter analyses US legal justifications for its actions and evaluates the potential for broader impacts on international human rights and humanitarian law.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationHuman Rights in Times of Transition
Subtitle of host publicationLiberal Democracies and Challenges of National Security
EditorsKasey McCall-Smith, Andrea Birdsall, Elisenda Casanas Adam
Place of PublicationCheltenham
PublisherEdward Elgar
Chapter6
Pages116–138
Number of pages23
ISBN (Electronic)9781789909890
ISBN (Print)9781789909883
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 17 Nov 2020

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Counterterrorism and challenges to human rights: Justifying drones and targeted killing as acts of self-defence'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this