Decolonizing the Intersection: Black Male Studies as a Critique of Intersectionality's Indebtedness to Subculture of Violence Theory

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (peer-reviewed)

Abstract

The last 30 years have seen tremendous advances in gender theory. Despite these advances, which promised a new diagnosis of anti-Black racism through the deployment of a tripartied complexity of race, class, and gender, the interpretation of Black males has remained eerily similar to the racist theories of sociologists and criminologists from the preceding era. This presentation problematizes the continuity between subculture and contraculture theories of violence used by criminologists, sociologists, and (white) feminism from the late 1960s to the 1990s and contemporary intersectional analysis. It is argued that Black Male Studies is a necessary alternative to our current intersectional framework.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationCritical Psychology Praxis
Subtitle of host publicationPsychosocial Non-Alignment to Modernity/Coloniality
EditorsRobert Beshara
PublisherTaylor & Francis
Chapter11
Pages132-153
Number of pages23
Edition1
ISBN (Electronic)9781000350982, 9781000350944
ISBN (Print)9780367635640
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2021

Publication series

NameAdvances in Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology Series
PublisherRoutledge

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