Decomposing Immersion: Effects of Game Demand and Display Type on Auditory Evoked Potentials

Stephen H. Fairclough, Christopher G. Burns

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Immersion is used to describe the degree of psychological engagement with a computer game. A study was performed to investigate the relative contribution of game demand (easy, hard, impossible) and display type (small 5 display, large TV display, head-mounted display) on the experience of immersion. Fifteen participants played a racing game in a range of conditions. Players' experience of immersion was captured via a subjective questionnaire and evoked cortical potentials to an auditory oddball task. Results indicated that slow wave potentials were sensitive to task demand, i.e. impossible demand reduced attention to the game. There was also a weak effect of display type at both frontal and central sites that was indicative of greater immersion for the large TV screen compared to other display types. This study provides preliminary data on the decomposition of immersion into sensory and cognitive components.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationCHI '13 Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems
Place of PublicationNew York, NY, USA
PublisherACM Association for Computing Machinery
Pages1095–1100
ISBN (Print)9781450319522
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 27 Apr 2013
Event2013 ACM SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems : Changing Perspectives - Palais de Congrès de Paris, Paris, France
Duration: 27 Apr 20132 May 2013
https://chi2013.acm.org

Publication series

NameCHI EA '13
PublisherAssociation for Computing Machinery

Conference

Conference2013 ACM SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems
Abbreviated titleCHI 2013
Country/TerritoryFrance
CityParis
Period27/04/132/05/13
Internet address

Keywords

  • ERP
  • immersion
  • games

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