Decrease in sleep duration and poor sleep quality over time is associated with an increased risk of incident non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

Yoo Jin Um, Yoosoo Chang*, Hyun-Suk Jung, In Young Cho, Jun Ho Shin, Hocheol Shin, Sarah H Wild, Christopher D Byrne, Seungho Ryu

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The impact of changes in sleep duration and sleep quality over time on the non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) risk is not known. We investigated whether change in sleep duration and change in sleep quality between baseline and follow up are associated with risk of developing incident NAFLD. The cohort study included 86,530 Korean adults without NAFLD and with a low fibrosis score at baseline. Median follow-up was 3.6 years. Sleep duration and quality were as-sessed using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. Hepatic steatosis (HS) and liver fibrosis were assessed using ultrasonography and the fibrosis-4 index (FIB-4). Cox proportional hazard models were used to determine hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). 12,127 subjects with incident HS and 559 with incident HS plus intermediate/high FIB-4 were identified. Com-paring decrease in sleep duration of >1hour, with stable sleep duration, the multivariate-adjusted HR (95% CIs) for incident HS was 1.24 (1.15–1.35). The corresponding HRs for incident HS plus intermediate/high FIB-4 was 1.58 (1.10–2.29). Comparing persistently poor sleep quality with persistently good sleep quality, the multivariate-adjusted HR for incident HS was 1.13 (95% CI, 1.05–1.20). A decrease in sleep duration or poor sleep quality over time was associated with an increased risk of incident NAFLD, underscoring an important potential role for good sleep in preventing NAFLD risk.
Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of personalized medicine
Volume12
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 11 Jan 2022

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