Describing transitions in residential status over 10 years in the very old: Results from the Newcastle 85+ Study

Laurie E. Davies, Katie Brittain, Heather Wilkinson, Sue Lewis, Louise Robinson, Andrew Kingston

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: the very old (aged ≥ 85) are the fastest growing subpopulation of many developed countries but little is known about how their place of residence changes over time. We investigated transitions in residential status in an inception cohort of 85-year-olds over 10 years. 

Methods: data were drawn from the Newcastle 85+ Study, a population-based longitudinal study of individuals aged 85 in 2006 (i.e. born in 1921) and permanently registered with a Newcastle or North Tyneside general practice (n = 849). 

Results: 76.3% lived in standard (non-supported) housing at baseline (age = 85) and few moved into a care home. The majority either remained in standard housing or died over the study period. A significant number who lived in standard housing had dependency and frailty at baseline. 

Discussion: given the undersupply of care homes, and preference of older people to remain in their own homes as they age, the questions posed by this analysis are how to survive to 85 and remain in standard housing until the age of 85? And how, and by whom, are such a group being supported to remain at home? We need qualitative research to explore the informal-formal care networks of the very old.

Original languageEnglish
Number of pages5
JournalAge and Ageing
Volume51
Issue number3
Early online date28 Mar 2022
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2022

Keywords

  • care homes
  • housing
  • older people
  • transitions
  • very old

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