Design, adaptation and convention: The emergence of higher order graphical representations

Nicolas Fay, Simon Garrod, Tracy MacLeod, John Lee, Jon Oberlander

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

To study the development of graphical conventions we had members of a simulated community play a series of graphical interaction games with partners drawn from the same pool (Experiment 1). Once the community was established, a conventional referring scheme emerged that facilitated high levels of semantic coordination, with reduced communicative effort. Next, a forced choice reaction time study (Experiment 2) demonstrated that graphical conventions developed in communities offer a distinct processing advantage when compared with those developed by isolated pairs (i.e. participants who always interact with the same partner). This is interpreted as evidence that the graphical conventions that evolve within a closed community constitute higher order cognitions, the whole being greater than the sum of its parts.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 26th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society
EditorsKenneth Forbus, Dedre Gentner, Terry Regier
Pages363-368
Number of pages6
Publication statusPublished - 2004
EventTwenty-Sixth Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society - Chicago, IL, United States
Duration: 4 Aug 20047 Aug 2004

Conference

ConferenceTwenty-Sixth Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CityChicago, IL
Period4/08/047/08/04

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