Detection of physiological deterioration by the SNAP40 wearable device compared to standard monitoring devices in the emergency department: the SNAP40-ED study

Matthew J. Reed, Megan Mcgrath, Polly L. Black, Steff Lewis, Christopher Mccann, Stewart Whiting, Rachel O’brien, Alison Grant, Beth Harrison, Laura Skyrme, Miranda Odam

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: In recent years, there has been increasing focus on the earlier detection of deterioration in the clinical condition of hospital patients with the aim of instigating earlier treatment to reverse this deterioration and prevent
adverse outcomes. This is especially important in the ED, a dynamic environment with large volumes of undifferentiated patients, which carries inherent patient risk. SNAP40 is an innovative medical-grade device that can be worn on the upper arm that continuously monitors patients’ vital signs including relative changes in systolic blood pressure, respiratory rate, heart rate, movement, blood oxygen saturation and temperature. It uses automated risk analysis to potentially allow clinical staff to easily and quickly identify high-risk patients. The aim of this study is to investigate whether the SNAP40 device is able to identify deterioration in the vital sign physiology of an ED patient earlier than current standard monitoring and observation charting techniques.

Methods/design: Single centre, teaching hospital ED open label, prospective, observational cohort study recruiting 250 high acuity participants aged 16 years or over presenting to the ED. Participants will be approached and enrolled
in the ED and after consent will have the SNAP40 wearable monitoring device attached which will be used alongside standard care monitoring. Participants will be observed throughout their time in the ED. Any SNAP40 device alarm, standard monitoring alarms or standard practice vital sign observations indicating a deterioration in a patient’s vital sign physiology (defined as an increase in NEWS score) will be recorded. Primary outcome is time to detection of deterioration. Secondary outcomes include staff time spent performing observations and responding to standard monitoring alarms, clinical escalation of care when deterioration is detected and participants and staff rating of
experience of both SNAP40 and current monitoring.

Discussion: The SNAP40-ED study aims to recruit 250 patients. It will be the first study to compare the ability of a novel ambulatory monitoring device to detect deterioration compared to standard care in the ED. It may allow the earlier detection of deterioration in the clinical condition of ED patients and therefore earlier treatment to reverse this deterioration and prevent adverse outcomes.

Trial registration: NCT03179267 ClinicalTrials.gov. Registered on June 17, 2017
Original languageEnglish
JournalDiagnostic and Prognostic Research
Volume2
Issue number1
Early online date3 Sep 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2018

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