Detection of substructure in the gravitationally lensed quasar MG0414+0534 using mid-infrared and radio VLBI observations

Chelsea L. Macleod, Ramsey Jones, Eric Agol, Christopher S. Kochanek

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

We present 11.2 μm observations of the gravitationally lensed, radio-loud zs = 2.64 quasar MG0414+0534, obtained using the Michelle camera on Gemini North. We find a flux ratio anomaly of A2/A1 = 0.93 ± 0.02 for the quasar images A1 and A2. When combined with the 11.7 μm measurements from Minezaki et al., the A2/A1 flux ratio is nearly 5σ from the expected ratio for a model based on the two visible lens galaxies. The mid-IR flux ratio anomaly can be explained by a satellite (substructure), 0.″3 northeast of image A2, as can the detailed very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) structures of the jet produced by the quasar. When we combine the mid-IR flux ratios with high-resolution VLBI measurements, we find a best-fit mass between 106.2 and 107.5 M inside the Einstein radius for a satellite substructure modeled as a singular isothermal sphere at the redshift of the main lens (zl = 0.96). We are unable to set an interesting limit on the mass to light ratio due to its proximity to the quasar image A2. While the observations used here were technically difficult, surveys of flux anomalies in gravitational lenses with the James Webb Space Telescope will be simple, fast, and should well constrain the abundance of substructure in dark matter halos.

Original languageEnglish
Article number35
JournalAstrophysical Journal
Volume773
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 10 Aug 2013

Keywords

  • galaxies: structure
  • gravitational lensing: strong

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