Developing an IT standard in China - What lessons can we learn from this?

Xiaobai Shen*, Ian Graham, James Stewart, Robin Williams

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

While users in the rest of the World have been offered 3G mobile phones based on either the CDMA2000 or W-CDMA standards, users in China have the additional option of using phones based on the TD-SCDMA standard. As a technology largely developed by Chinese actors and only implemented in China, TD-SCDMA has been seen as a techno-nationalist project orchestrated by the Chinese government, unequivocally supported by Chinese firms. In China, the media has also started trumpeting the success of this "indigenous innovation". This paper adopts a science and technology studies (STS) framework, opening up the technological "black-box", to explore how global and national institutional and social elements have been embedded in and impact on the artefacts of TD-SCDMA technology. It is concluded that rather than see TD-SCDMA as an indigenous Chinese technology, its history exemplifies how standards and the intellectual property embedded in them lead to a complex hybridization between the global and national sectoral systems of innovation.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication2011 7th International Conference on Standardization and Innovation in Information Technology, SIIT 2011
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 19 Dec 2011
Event2011 7th International Conference on Standardization and Innovation in Information Technology, SIIT 2011 - Berlin, Germany
Duration: 28 Sep 201130 Sep 2011

Publication series

Name2011 7th International Conference on Standardization and Innovation in Information Technology, SIIT 2011

Conference

Conference2011 7th International Conference on Standardization and Innovation in Information Technology, SIIT 2011
CountryGermany
CityBerlin
Period28/09/1130/09/11

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Developing an IT standard in China - What lessons can we learn from this?'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this