Development of a systematic mapping review protocol for the most recent evidence on ruminant infectious disease frequency and disease- associated mortality: Ethiopia as a case study

Theodora Tsouloufi, Louise Donnison, Karen Smyth, Andrew Peters

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Almost 19% of the GDP of Ethiopia results from livestock production. Ruminants, in particular, form the majority of the national herd and are a critical source of income for smallholder farmers. Infectious diseases have been identified as a major cause of reduced livestock productivity in low- and middle- income countries (LMICs); therefore, a sound and comprehensive understanding of the relevant evidence would be beneficial in order to enable decision making on disease control policies. However, livestock disease data from sub-Saharan Africa is variable and disparate, which poses a challenge for evidence synthesis. This paper describes a protocol for a systematic mapping review of the recent available evidence on ruminant disease prevalence and associated mortality in Ethiopia. Literature sources will be identified using database search strategies. The titles, abstracts and subsequently, full texts will be screened for inclusion based on predefined eligibility criteria. Specific data will be extracted and a preliminary qualitative assessment of the evidence will be performed using predefined indicators. The planned systematic map will be the first to provide a large-scale overview of the available ruminant disease evidence in a LMIC; the final output will be an interactive dashboard tool to inform critical stakeholders in policy and research.
Original languageEnglish
JournalAnimal Health Research Reviews
Early online date7 Sep 2020
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 27 Oct 2020

Keywords

  • cattle
  • infectious diseases
  • morbidity
  • small ruminants
  • sub-Saharan Africa
  • systematic map

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