Developments in marine invertebrate primary culture reveal novel cell morphologies in the model bivalve Crassostrea gigas

Robert Potts, Alejandro Gutierrez, Yennifer Cortés Araya, Ross Houston, Tim Bean

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Cell culture provides useful model systems used in a wide range of biological applications, but its utility in marine invertebrates is limited due to the lack of immortalised cell lines. Primary cell and tissue cultures are typically used but remain poorly characterised for oysters, which can cause issues with experimental consistency and reproducibility. Improvements to methods of repeatable isolation, culture, and characterisation of oyster cells and tissues are required to help address these issues. In the current study, systematic improvements have been developed to facilitate the culture of primary cells from adult Pacific oyster tissues and identify novel cell morphologies that have not been reported previously. Cultures analysed by light microscopy, qPCR, and live cell imaging demonstrated maintenance of live, metabolically active Pacific oyster cells for several weeks post-explant. Interestingly, whole hearts dissected from adult oysters were found to continue contracting rhythmically up to 8 weeks after being transferred to a tissue culture system. Mantle tissue explants were also actively moving in the culture system. These improvements in primary cell culture of bivalves may be beneficial for research in ecotoxicology, virology, immunology, and genetic resistance to disease.
Original languageEnglish
Article number8:e9180
Pages (from-to)1-16
Number of pages16
JournalPeerJ
VolumeN/A
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jun 2020

Keywords

  • Primary cell culture
  • Pacific oyster
  • Tissue explant
  • Live cell imaging

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