'Directional apraxia': a unitary account of mirror writing following brain injury or as found in normal young children

Sergio Della Sala, Roberto Cubelli

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Mirror writing refers to the production of individual letters, whole words or sentences in reverse direction. Unintentional mirror writing has been observed in young children and brain-damaged people and interpreted as the manifestation of different cognitive impairments. We report on a mirror writing patient following left hemisphere stroke and the mirror writing phenomena in one sample of children learning to write. We propose a unitary account of mirror writing as the unavailability of the appropriate movement direction representation, either because the right configuration has yet to be specified fully (children learning to write) or because of its damage (acquired brain injury). For this reason, we propose that the lack of directional information relevant to writing be labelled 'directional apraxia'.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3-26
Number of pages24
JournalJournal of Neuropsychology
Volume1
Issue numberPt 1
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2007

Keywords

  • Apraxia, Ideomotor
  • Awareness
  • Child
  • Child, Preschool
  • Female
  • Frontal Lobe
  • Functional Laterality
  • Humans
  • Infarction, Middle Cerebral Artery
  • Male
  • Middle Aged
  • Neuropsychological Tests
  • Orientation
  • Parietal Lobe
  • Psychomotor Performance

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