Does Learning to Read Improve Intelligence? A Longitudinal Multivariate Analysis in Identical Twins From Age 7 to 16

Stuart J Ritchie, Timothy C Bates, Robert Plomin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Evidence from twin studies points to substantial environmental influences on intelligence, but the specifics of this influence are unclear. This study examined one developmental process that potentially causes intelligence differences: learning to read. In 1,890 twin pairs tested at 7, 9, 10, 12, and 16 years, a cross-lagged monozygotic-differences design was used to test for associations of earlier within-pair reading ability differences with subsequent intelligence differences. The results showed several such associations, which were not explained by differences in reading exposure and were not restricted to verbal cognitive domains. The study highlights the potentially important influence of reading ability, driven by the nonshared environment, on intellectual development and raises theoretical questions about the mechanism of this influence.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)n/a-n/a
JournalChild Development
Volume85
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 24 Jul 2014

Keywords

  • READING ACQUISITION
  • INTELLIGENCE QUOTIENT (IQ)
  • INCOME
  • Social Mobility
  • COGNITION
  • Child Development

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Does Learning to Read Improve Intelligence? A Longitudinal Multivariate Analysis in Identical Twins From Age 7 to 16'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this