Does personalized medicine exist and can you test it in a clinical trial?

Peter A. G. Sandercock*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalLiterature reviewpeer-review

Abstract

The idea that different patients will respond differently to the same treatment is not new. The recent advances in genomics and laboratory medicine have led to the hope that it will be possible to maximize the benefit and minimize the harms of each medical therapy by using an individuals' biomarker status to 'personalize' their treatment. The selection of treatment for each individual would then be determined, not just by their disease status (or an estimate of the risk of developing a disease or disease progression), but also by their genetic makeup or by other measurable characteristics, such as the level of a particular biomarker in the blood. This review discusses the extent to which personalized medicine might be applied in stroke, and the implications for global stroke health care.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)994-999
Number of pages6
JournalInternational Journal of Stroke
Volume10
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2015

Keywords

  • clinical trials
  • genomics
  • personalized medicine
  • stratified medicine
  • ACUTE ISCHEMIC-STROKE
  • TISSUE-PLASMINOGEN ACTIVATOR
  • UPPER-LIMB RECOVERY
  • ATRIAL-FIBRILLATION
  • RANDOMIZED-TRIALS
  • HEMORRHAGIC TRANSFORMATION
  • COMPUTED-TOMOGRAPHY
  • PRECISION MEDICINE
  • SECONDARY ANALYSIS
  • HEART-DISEASE

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