Does the Order of Item Difficulty of the Addenbrooke's Cognitive Examination Add Anything to Subdomain Scores in the Clinical Assessment of Dementia

Sarah McGrory, John Starr, Susan Shenkin, Elizabeth Austin, John R. Hodges

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: The Addenbrooke's Cognitive Examination (ACE) is used to measure cognition across a range of domains in dementia. Identifying the order in which cognitive decline occurs across items, and whether this varies between dementia aetiologies could add more information to subdomain scores. Method: ACE-Revised data from 350 patients were split into three groups: Alzheimer's type (n = 131), predominantly frontal (n = 119) and other frontotemporal lobe degenerative disorders (n = 100). Results of factor analysis and Mokken scaling analysis were compared. Results: Principal component analysis revealed one factor for each group. Confirmatory factor analysis found that the one-factor model fit two samples poorly. Mokken analyses revealed different item ordering in terms of difficulty for each group. Conclusion: The different patterns for each diagnostic group could aid in the separation of these different types of dementia.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)155
Number of pages169
JournalDementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorders
Volume5
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2015

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Does the Order of Item Difficulty of the Addenbrooke's Cognitive Examination Add Anything to Subdomain Scores in the Clinical Assessment of Dementia'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this