Duration of consultant experience and patient outcome following acute medical unit admission. An observational cohort study

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract / Description of output

Background The effect of the duration of consultant experience on clinical outcomes in the acute medical unit (AMU) model remains unknown.

Methods Unscheduled AMU admissions (n=66,929) admitted by 56 consultant physicians between 2017 and 2020 to two large teaching hospital AMUs in Lothian, Scotland were examined. The associations of consultant experience on AMU with patient discharge, mortality, readmission and postdischarge death were calculated adjusting for clinical acuity, pathology and comorbidity.

Results Increasing consultant experience was associated with a continuous increase in likelihood of early AMU discharge (odds ratio (OR) 1.08; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.07–1.10; p<0.001 per 5 years' experience), which persisted after adjustment for confounders (OR 1.06; 95% CI: 1.01–1.11; p=0.01). There was no association with early readmission, death after discharge or 30-day inpatient mortality. The marginal effect estimate translates into 31 (95% CI: 25–36), 41 (95% CI: 30–53) and 52 (95% CI: 35–71) additional safe discharges per 1,000 admissions for clinicians of 15, 20 and 25 years' experience, respectively compared with those recently completing training.

Conclusions Increasing consultant physician experience associates with early safe discharge after AMU admission. These data suggest that the support and retention of experienced clinicians is vital if escalating pressures on unscheduled medical care are to be addressed.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)458-466
Number of pages9
JournalClinical Medicine
Volume23
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 29 Sept 2023

Keywords / Materials (for Non-textual outputs)

  • experience
  • safety
  • acute medicine

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Duration of consultant experience and patient outcome following acute medical unit admission. An observational cohort study'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this