Dyadic models emerging from the longitudinal structural equation modeling tradition: Parallels with ecological models of interspecific interaction

Nilam Ram, Amy Pedersen

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (peer-reviewed)

Abstract

In order for models to reflect the theory of developmental contextualism, multiple change processes or interactions should be considered: including individual changes, context/environmental changes, and the reciprocal relationships among individuals and/or their environments (see Ram & Nesselroade, 2007, for further elaboration). Or, as put by Wohlwill (1991), “. . . what [reciprocal relationships] would call for are methodologies that allow one to model the interpatterning between two sets of processes each of which is undergoing change, in part as a function of the other” (p. 128). In sum, the predominant theoretical perspective underlying the study of human development highlights the need for models that articulate how, when, and why dynamic entities interact.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationModeling dyadic and interdependent data in the developmental and behavioral sciences
EditorsNoel A. Card, James P. Selig, Todd Little
Place of PublicationNew York
PublisherNew York: Routledge
Chapter5
Pages87-106
ISBN (Electronic)978-0805859720
ISBN (Print)0805859721
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 9 Jul 2008

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