Dynamics of epidermal growth factor receptor internalization studied by Nanovid light microscopy and electron microscopy in combination with immunogold labeling

R J van 't Hof, L H Defize, R Nuijdens, M de Brabander, A J Verkleij, J Boonstra

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Individual gold particles with a diameter of approximately 10 to 40 nm can be visualized using video-enhanced contrast microscopy (Nanovid) (De Brabander et al., Cell Motil. Cytoskel. 6, 105-113 (1986)). This technique allows a study of the dynamic properties of receptors and ligands in living cells at high resolution. We have studied epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor internalization in human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells, using a monoclonal anti-EGF-receptor antibody conjugated to 20-nm gold particles, referred to as 2E9-gold. Exposure of A431 cells to 2E9-gold at 37 degrees C resulted in binding of the complex at the cell surface. Most of the gold particles exhibit a Brownian type of movement, while a minority appeared immobile. Binding of the 2E9-gold complex is followed by internalization, as judged from Nanovid light microscopy studies in combination with electron microscopic observations. The internalized gold particles clearly cluster into large aggregates, most likely multivesicular bodies. Individual gold particles as well as aggregates are characterized by a saltatory movement, by which the gold particles eventually move from the cell periphery towards the cell center. Addition of EGF results in an increased rate of internalization of 2E9-gold, while Na-azide and nocodazole completely immobilize the intracellular gold particles, as has been demonstrated previously for the transferrin receptor.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)5-13
Number of pages9
JournalEuropean journal of cell biology
Volume48
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 1989

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