Early Miocene calc-alkaline felsic tuffs within deep-marine turbidites in the Kyrenia Range, north Cyprus, with a possible post-collisional eruptive centre in western Anatolia

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Abstract / Description of output

Felsic tuff as a direct fallout deposit is known from one small area in the Kyrenia Range, north Cyprus, within deep-sea terrigenous turbidites. Nearby tuffaceous siltstones contain compositionally similar felsic volcanic rocks (c. 5–10%), mixed with terrigenous material. Sedimentary evidence indicates that the fallout tuff was variable reworked locally, whereas the tuffaceous siltstones are interpreted as turbidites mixed with terrigenous material derived from Anatolia. U–Pb dating of zircons that were extracted from a sample of relatively homogeneous tuff yielded a dominant age of 16.64 ± 0.12 Ma (Burdigalian). Zircon trace-element analysis indicates predominant derivation from within-plate-type felsic magma. Whole-rock chemical analysis of the tuffaceous sediments as a whole is compatible with a felsic arc source, similar to the post-collisional magmatism within Anatolia. Regional comparisons suggest that the nearest volcanism of similar age and composition is located c. 500 km away, within the Kırka area (Eskişehir region) of the Western Anatolia Volcanic Province. Evidence of tephra dispersal in the western Mediterranean region and climatic modelling suggests E-wards prevailing winds and therefore tephra transport over southern Anatolia and adjacent areas during early Miocene time. The north Cyprus tuffs could represent powerful Minoan (Plinian)-type eruptions in western Anatolia, coupled with SE-wards tephra transport during and soon after the onset of post-collisional magmatism.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-13
JournalGeological Magazine
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 9 Feb 2021

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