Emotion recognition in children with Down syndrome: Influence of emotion label and expression intensity

Katie Cebula, Jennifer Wishart, Diane Willis, Tom Pitcairn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Some children with Down syndrome may experience difficulties in recognising facial emotions, particularly fear, but it is not clear why, nor how such skills can best be facilitated. Using a photo-matching task, emotion recognition was tested in children with Down syndrome, children with non-specific intellectual disabilities and cognitively-matched typically-developing children (all groups N = 21) under four conditions: veridical vs exaggerated emotions and emotion-labelling vs generic task instructions. In all groups, exaggerating emotions facilitated recognition accuracy and speed, with emotion labelling facilitating recognition accuracy. Overall accuracy and speed did not differ in the children with Down syndrome, although recognition of fear was poorer than in the typically developing children and unrelated to emotion label use. Implications for interventions are considered.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)138-155
Number of pages18
JournalAmerican Journal on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Volume122
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Mar 2017

Keywords

  • Down syndrome
  • emotion recognition
  • emotion labelling

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