End of life and ‘living technologies’: The role of Telemedicine in palliative care of children and young people

Sharon Levy, Gayle Steele

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaperpeer-review

Abstract / Description of output

For many, the home environment is the embodiment of independent “living” in which technology is used to enhance and support good quality of life. Home assistive technologies were initially developed to support people with special needs and elderly people and among other things to help them remain within their homes and communities for as long as is feasible and safe. Our work focuses an the other end of the technology and design spectrum: one where Telemedicine is used to support optimal palliative care at home, for children at the end of their lives. We present preliminary results of a pilot study. We argue that remote care provision should be considered as an integral part of care, to complement and enhance current end of life care as well as providing advice and support, regardless of where patients reside. We advocate that future developments in assistive living technologies adopt an increasingly holistic “whole-of-life” approach, including the too often understudied and under-reported end-of-life phase.
Original languageEnglish
Pages274-277
Number of pages4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011
EventPervasive Health 2011 - Dublin, Ireland
Duration: 23 May 201126 May 2011

Conference

ConferencePervasive Health 2011
Country/TerritoryIreland
CityDublin
Period23/05/1126/05/11

Keywords / Materials (for Non-textual outputs)

  • Telemedicine
  • Palliative Care
  • Care at home
  • Children and young people

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