Entrepreneurial justice: Syria, the Commission for International Justice and Accountability and the renewal of international criminal justice

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract / Description of output

This article argues that the crisis of governance generated by the Syrian civil war presents both a challenge and an opportunity to practitioners of international criminal justice. The article also argues that irrespective of the Syrian case, international criminal law (ICL) institutions are in need of innovation and that increasingly ICL discourses display a blurring between public and private idioms. Evaluating the contribution of the Commission of International Justice and Accountability (CIJA) is one way then of assessing how ICL might evolve. This article characterises CIJA’s work as exemplifying ‘entrepreneurial justice’, not only in Syria, but in a range of other (post)conflict settings. We can define entrepreneurial justice as the identification of a gap or weakness in existing public accountability fora and the creation of a new private or privatised organization and/or approach that seeks to address (at least part of) this gap. Although questions remain about CIJA’s own accountability, along with its potential contribution to realising accountability, this article suggests that its presence within the ICL field is a necessary one and that it has already started to have effects within Syria and beyond.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1165-1185
Number of pages21
JournalEuropean Journal of International Law
Volume30
Issue number4
Early online date13 Apr 2020
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 13 Apr 2020

Keywords / Materials (for Non-textual outputs)

  • international law
  • international criminal justice
  • Syria
  • non-governmental organisation
  • United Nations
  • International Criminal Court

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