Erythrocyte complement receptor 1 (CR1) expression level is not associated with polymorphisms in the promoter or 3' untranslated regions of the CR1 gene

I A Cockburn, J A Rowe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Complement receptor 1 (CR1) expression level on erythrocytes is genetically determined and is associated with high (H) and low (L) expression alleles identified by a HindIII restriction fragment-length polymorphism (RFLP) in intron 27 of the CR1 gene. The L allele confers protection against severe malaria in Papua New Guinea, probably because erythrocytes with low CR1 expression, are less able to form pathogenic rosettes with Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes. Despite the biological importance of erythrocyte CR1, the genetic mutation controlling CR1 expression level remains unknown. We investigated the possibility that mutations in the upstream or 3' untranslated regions of the CR1 gene could control erythrocyte CR1 level. We identified several novel polymorphisms; however, the mutations did not segregate with erythrocyte CR1 expression level or the H and L alleles. Therefore, high and low erythrocyte CR1 levels cannot be explained by polymorphisms in transcriptional control elements in the upstream or 3' untranslated regions of the CR1 gene.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)17-20
Number of pages4
JournalInternational journal of immunogenetics
Volume33
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2006

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