Estimating virtual targets for lingual stop consonants using general Tau theory

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract / Description of output

This paper investigates the existence and position of virtual targets during the production of stop consonants. Using the equations from general Tau theory to model the time-course of tongue constriction formation movements, targets were estimated by fitting these equations on observed tongue constriction variables extracted from real EMA data from 2 native speakers of English. Results suggest that targets are virtual for 50 to 60% of movements. For these movements, virtual targets of the tongue tip constriction are predicted to occur around 0.1 cm beyond the palate, and virtual targets for the tongue dorsum constriction are predicted to occur between 0.05 and 0.2 cm beyond the palate. Our results suggest that the time-course of movement is planned so that the onset of closure occurs with relatively high velocity: closure onset is generally located very close in time to the time of peak velocity.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the Annual Conference of the International Speech Communication Association
Subtitle of host publicationInterspeech 2023
EditorsNaomi Harte, Julie Carson-Berndsen, Gareth Jones
Place of PublicationDublin
PublisherISCA
Pages3083-3087
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sept 2023
EventInterspeech 2023 - Dublin, Ireland
Duration: 20 Aug 202324 Aug 2023
Conference number: 24
https://www.interspeech2023.org/

Publication series

NameInterspeech - Annual Conference of the International Speech Communication Association
PublisherISCA
ISSN (Electronic)2308-457X

Conference

ConferenceInterspeech 2023
Country/TerritoryIreland
CityDublin
Period20/08/2324/08/23
Internet address

Keywords / Materials (for Non-textual outputs)

  • speech production
  • virtual target
  • Tau theory

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