Ethical and research dilemmas arising from a questionnaire study of psychological morbidity among general practice managers

A Sheikh, Brian Hurwitz, M Parker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

A questionnaire-based research project enquiring into the psychological health of general practice managers found that 5% of managers admitted to suicidal ideas. This paper explores the moral issues raised when research conducted at a distance uncovers information about participants which indicates that they may be at increased risk of harm. It examines whether the authors of such studies have responsibilities towards their research participants beyond those of analysing and properly interpreting the data supplied to them. The paper is an exercise in self-reflection and self-criticism; not all the questions posed and explored by it can be answered definitively. Implications for planning studies of this kind are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)32-5
Number of pages4
JournalBritish Journal of General Practice
Volume51
Issue number462
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2001

Keywords

  • Administrative Personnel
  • Anxiety
  • Confidentiality
  • Depression
  • Ethics, Medical
  • Family Practice
  • Health Surveys
  • Humans
  • Mental Health
  • Stress, Psychological
  • Suicide
  • Surveys and Questionnaires
  • Journal Article
  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

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