Ethnological theories of race/sex in nineteenth-century black thought: Implications for the race/gender debate of the twenty-first century

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (peer-reviewed)peer-review

Abstract / Description of output

The presumed opposition between man and woman is a very recent phenomenon in the historical scope of gender. This is especially true for black Americans who were thought to be “ungendered” throughout history. In the nineteenth century only the white race was gendered—blacks were believed to be too savage to share these distinctions. The theory of gender that white ethnologists applied to black Americans in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries was also taken up by blacks, with implications for our current intersectional historiographies.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationThe Oxford Handbook of Philosophy and Race
EditorsNaomi Zack
Place of PublicationNew York, NY
PublisherOxford University Press
Pages565-575
ISBN (Electronic)9780190236953
ISBN (Print)9780190236977, 9780190236960
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2017

Keywords / Materials (for Non-textual outputs)

  • ethnology
  • race
  • gender
  • evolution
  • intersectional historiographies

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