Experimental manipulation of immune-mediated disease and its fitness costs for rodent malaria parasites

Gráinne H Long, Brian H K Chan, Judith E Allen, Andrew F Read, Andrea L Graham

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Explaining parasite virulence (harm to the host) represents a major challenge for evolutionary and biomedical scientists alike. Most theoretical models of virulence evolution assume that virulence arises as a direct consequence of host exploitation, the process whereby parasites convert host resources into transmission opportunities. However, infection-induced disease can be immune-mediated (immunopathology). Little is known about how immunopathology affects parasite fitness, or how it will affect the evolution of parasite virulence. Here we studied the effects of immunopathology on infection-induced host mortality rate and lifetime transmission potential - key components of parasite fitness - using the rodent malaria model, Plasmodium chabaudi chabaudi.
Original languageEnglish
Article number128
Number of pages11
JournalBMC Evolutionary Biology
Volume8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2008

Keywords

  • Animals
  • Biological Evolution
  • Disease Models, Animal
  • Female
  • Genotype
  • Host-Parasite Interactions
  • Immunity, Innate
  • Malaria
  • Mice
  • Mice, Inbred C57BL
  • Plasmodium chabaudi
  • Receptors, Interleukin-10
  • Virulence

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