Exploiting extreme phenotypes to investigate haplotype structure and detect signatures of selection for body weight in broilers

Eirini Tarsani, Georgios Theodorou, Irida Palamidi, Antonios Kominakis

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstractpeer-review

Abstract

In the present study we used a total number (n=700) of male broilers with records on body weight at 35 days (BW35) by taking the 5% lower (n=350, average BW35=1876.5 g, L) and upper (n=350, average BW35=2417.4 g, H) tails of a broiler population (n=3,500). We performed haplotype blocks (HB) analysis in the two tail populations and detected signatures of selection using the Wright’s fixation index FST and pooled (both tails) data. Number of HBs was lower in the H than in the L tail (34,005 vs. 38,442) while the average HB length was higher in the H when contrasted to the L tail (9878.5 vs. 7597.3 bp). The genome coverage by HBs was higher in the H when compared to the tail (0.37 vs. 0.32). A total number of 53 signatures of selection dispersed in 18 autosomes was suggested by markers exhibiting FST values higher than 0.20. A number of 192 QTLs related to growth traits (e.g. carcass weight) were found to lie within genomic regions 50 kb downstream and upstream the selection signatures with 96 QTLs having been reported to affect body weight. The search for putative candidate genes within the specified regions revealed 67 positional candidate genes, some of them related to growth traits (e.g. PSMB4, MYOM2, ATP8B2, CAMK2D). Three genes (GNAO1, MYOM2 and TPM3) were found to participate in muscle contraction via functional enrichment analysis.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 17 Sep 2018
EventEPC 2018: XVth European Poultry Conference - Valamar Lacroma Hotel, Dubrovnik, Croatia
Duration: 17 Sep 201821 Sep 2018
http://www.epc2018.com/

Conference

ConferenceEPC 2018
Country/TerritoryCroatia
CityDubrovnik
Period17/09/1821/09/18
Internet address

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