Exploring physical education teachers’ conceptualisations of health and wellbeing discourse across the four nations of the UK

Shirley Gray, Stephanie Hardley, Anna Bryant, Oliver Hooper, Julie Stirrup, Rachel Sandford, David Aldous, Nicola Carse

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract / Description of output

As a group of researchers representing England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales, we previously carried out a comparative analysis of the health discourses evident within the physical education (PE) curriculum of each UK nation (Authors, 2022). We uncovered complex ‘health’ landscapes, represented through different discourses of health across contexts and shifting discourses within contexts. The purpose of the present proof of concept study is to extend this cross-border work by exploring how UK PE teachers conceptualise health and wellbeing (HWB), and to identify the ways in which their conceptualisations align (or not) with their respective curricula. We found some alignment between the teachers’ understanding of HWB and their respective curricular documentation, which was highlighted in the similarities and differences across contexts. Furthermore, all of the PE teachers had some understanding of HWB as a holistic and broad concept. We argue that understanding the various conceptualisations of HWB within and across contexts can serve as a useful foundation for cross-border dialogue, which may support the development of PE teachers’ critical reading of curriculum and their capacity and authority to contribute to future curriculum developments.
Original languageEnglish
JournalCurriculum Studies in Health and Physical Education
Early online date10 Feb 2023
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 10 Feb 2023

Keywords / Materials (for Non-textual outputs)

  • health and wellbeing
  • curriculum
  • discourse
  • physical education
  • cross-border learning

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