Expression of the CD2 activation epitope T11-3 (CD2R) on T cells in rheumatoid arthritis, juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, ankylosing spondylitis, and Lyme disease: phenotypic and functional analysis

A J Potocnik, H Menninger, S Y Yang, K Pirner, A Krause, G R Burmester, B M Bröker, P Hept, G Weseloh, H Michels

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract / Description of output

CD2R is an activation-associated epitope unmasked by a conformational change of the CD2 cell-surface glycoprotein. In spite of elaborate studies on the role of CD2 and CD2R in adhesion and stimulation of T cells in vitro, no instances of CD2R expression in vivo were known to date. We report high levels of CD2R observed on blood and synovial fluid T cells in rheumatoid arthritis and on peripheral blood T cells in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, ankylosing spondylitis, and Lyme disease. In vivo, expression of CD2R was restricted to T cells, not limited to a particular T-cell subset and not correlated with the expression of p55 interleukin 2R (IL-2R) (CD25) or major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules. When stimulated to proliferation via CD2 or CD3, ex vivo CD2R+ T cells showed the same basic activation requirements as CD2R-T cells.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)351-8
Number of pages8
JournalScandinavian Journal of Immunology
Volume34
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - Sept 1991

Keywords / Materials (for Non-textual outputs)

  • Antigens, CD2
  • Antigens, Differentiation, T-Lymphocyte
  • Arthritis
  • Arthritis, Juvenile
  • Arthritis, Rheumatoid
  • Epitopes
  • Humans
  • Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic
  • Lyme Disease
  • Lymphocyte Activation
  • Phenotype
  • Receptors, Immunologic
  • Spondylitis, Ankylosing
  • T-Lymphocytes

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