Factors associated with pastoral community knowledge and occurrence of mycobacterial infections in human-animal interface areas of Nakasongola and Mubende districts, Uganda

Clovice Kankya, Adrian Muwonge, Susan Olet, Musso Munyeme, Demelash Biffa, John Opuda-Asibo, Eystein Skjerve, James Oloya

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are emerging opportunistic pathogens whose role in human and animal disease is increasingly being recognized. Major concerns are their role as opportunistic pathogens in HIV/AIDS infections. The role of open natural water sources as source and livestock/wildlife as reservoirs of infections to man are well documented. This presents a health challenge to the pastoral systems in Africa that rely mostly on open natural water sources to meet livestock and human needs. Recent study in the pastoral areas of Uganda showed infections with same genotypes of NTM in pastoralists and their livestock. The aim of this study was to determine the environmental, animal husbandry and socio-demographic factors associated with occurrence and the pastoral community knowledge of mycobacterial infections at the human-environment-livestock/wildlife interface (HELI) areas in pastoral ecosystems of Uganda.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)471
JournalBMC Public Health
Volume10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010

Keywords

  • Socioeconomic Factors
  • Animals
  • Zoonoses
  • Mycobacterium
  • Humans
  • Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
  • Animal Husbandry
  • Mycobacterium Infections
  • Uganda
  • Male
  • Female
  • Livestock

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