Feline spinal cord diseases

Katia Marioni-Henry*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The objective of this article is to review the recent literature that reports on the most common diseases affecting the spinal cord of cats, and to draw some general conclusions that will be useful to formulate diagnosis and prognosis for feline spinal patients. The most common types of feline spinal cord diseases documented were inflammatory/infectious diseases, and feline infectious peritonitis was the most common disease, representing approximately 50% of all feline myelitis. Neoplasms were documented in approximately 25% of cases; lymphosarcoma was the most common tumor affecting the spinal cord of cats, with reported prevalence between 28% and 40%. Cats diagnosed with spinal lymphosarcoma were significantly younger (median age 4 years) than cats with other spinal cord tumors (median age 10 years). Cats with clinical signs of intervertebral disc disease had a median age of 8 years, and 67% had Hansen type I disc protrusions. The most commonly affected intervertebral disc was at the L4 to L5 intervertebral disc space. Fibrocartilaginous embolism-affected older cats (median age 10 years), seemed to predominate in the cervicothoracic intumescence, and clinical signs were markedly lateralized, especially when the cervical region was affected.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1011-28
Number of pages18
JournalVeterinary Clinics of North America: Small Animal Practice
Volume40
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2010

Keywords

  • Spinal cord
  • Cat
  • Feline infectious peritonitis
  • Lymphosarcoma
  • Tumor
  • Intervertebral disc
  • INTERVERTEBRAL-DISK EXTRUSION
  • FIBROCARTILAGINOUS EMBOLIC MYELOPATHY
  • CENTRAL NERVOUS-SYSTEM
  • OF-THE-LITERATURE
  • INFECTIOUS PERITONITIS
  • NEUROAXONAL DYSTROPHY
  • ARACHNOID CYST
  • RETROSPECTIVE EVALUATION
  • HYPERVITAMINOSIS-A
  • SUBARACHNOID CYST

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