From Master Mason to Architect: James Smith’s Construction Techniques at the End of 17th Century in Scotland

Cristina Gonzalez-Longo, Dimitris Theodossopoulos

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract / Description of output

Colen Campbell referred to James Smith in Vitruvius Britannicus as the most experienced architect in Scotland. Smith started his career as a mason and worked his way up to become a leading Scottish architect at the end of 17th century, a period which saw the creation of architects’ professional identity. Smith was a mason’s son and spent some years in Rome training to become a priest. At his return, he worked with the leading architects and masons William Bruce and Robert Mylne in Holyrood Palace. This paper attempts to overview his career and architectural and ornamental repertoire, uncovering his construction strategies and techniques. It will analyse their origins, whether local, and the different practices when working in a variety of buildings and contexts, since he was a mason until his latest works as an architect, both in new build or when extending existing buildings.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationNuts & Bolts of Construction History
Subtitle of host publicationCulture, Technology and Society
Place of PublicationParis
PublisherPicard
Pages37-45
Volume2
ISBN (Print)978-2-7084-0929-3
Publication statusPublished - 2012

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'From Master Mason to Architect: James Smith’s Construction Techniques at the End of 17th Century in Scotland'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this