Genetic relationships between seasonal tissue levels in Scottish Blackface ewes and lamb growth traits

N. R. Lambe*, S. Brotherstone, J. Conington, G. Simm

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract / Description of output

Scottish Blackface ewes (no. = 308) were scanned four times per year using X-ray computed tomography (CT scanning) (pre-mating, pre-lambing, mid lactation and weaning), from 18 months to 5 years of age, giving a maximum of 16 scanning events per ewe. Total weights of carcass fat, internal fat and carcass muscle were estimated from the CT images at each scanning event. Lambs produced by these ewes were weighed at birth, mid lactation and weaning to calculate litter growth traits : litter birth weight; litter weight gain from birth until mid lactation; and litter weight gain from birth until weaning. Genetic (r g) and phenotypic (rp) correlations were estimated between ewe CT tissue traits and litter growth traits. Correlations between ewe CT tissue traits and litter size (LS) were also estimated. Ewe CT tissue traits were either unadjusted or adjusted for total soft tissue weight (sum of weights of carcass fat, internal fat and carcass muscle) to investigate relationships with either absolute tissue weights of carcass fat (CFWT), internal fat (IFWT), and carcass muscle (CMWT), or relative proportions of carcass fat (CFP), internal fat (IFP), and carcass muscle (CMP). Litter growth traits were either unadjusted or adjusted for litter size, to investigate relationships with total lamb burden (total litter birth weight (TBW), total litter weight gain from birth until mid lactation (TWGM), total litter weight gain from birth until weaning (TWGW)) or average lamb performance (average lamb birth weight (ABW), average lamb weight gain from birth until mid lactation (AWGM), average lamb weight gain from birth until weaning (AWGW)). Moderate to large positive genetic correlations were estimated between absolute weights of all three ewe tissues (CFWT, IFWT, CMWT), or muscle proportion (CMP), and litter size (LS). Significant positive genetic correlations were also estimated between weight (CMWT) or proportion (CMP) of muscle carried by the ewe pre-mating and total birth weight (TBW) and weight gains (TWGM, TWGW) of her litter, largely due to the associated increase in litter size. Muscle proportion (CMP) was not significantly correlated to average lamb weights or weight gains (ABW, AWGM, AWGW). Pre-lambing carcass fat weight (CFWT) and proportion (CFP) in the ewe showed positive genetic correlations with average lamb weights and weight gains (ABW, AWGM, AWGW), whereas, after lambing, CFP was negatively correlated with these lamb traits. Internal fat weight (IFWT) pre-mating showed positive genetic correlations with all litter growth traits (TBW, TWGM, TWGW, ABW, AWGM, AWGW). Average lamb growth traits were negatively correlated with pre-lambing internal fat proportion (IFP), but positively correlated to IFP at mid lactation and weaning. Correlations were also estimated between each pair of CT traits. Total internal fat weight and total carcass fat weight were very highly correlated (rp = 0.75, rg = 0.96). Correlations with total carcass muscle weight were smaller and positive for both carcass fat weight (r p = 0-48, rg = 0.12) and internal fat weight (r p = 0-42, rg = 0.20). The results suggest that selection for increased carcass muscle weight or proportion in a Scottish Blackface hill flock would have a positive effect on total weights of litters reared, but that selection against carcass fat weight or proportion in a breeding programme for Blackface sheep may have an impact on the maternal ability of the ewe. However, maintaining fat in internal depots may reduce the depletion of carcass fat during pregnancy, allowing this depot to provide energy for lactation, and may have a positive impact on lamb growth.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)11-21
Number of pages11
JournalAnimal science
Volume81
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2005

Keywords / Materials (for Non-textual outputs)

  • Body composition
  • Computed tomography
  • Ewes
  • Genetic parameters
  • Regression analysis

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Genetic relationships between seasonal tissue levels in Scottish Blackface ewes and lamb growth traits'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this