Goal-neglect links Stroop interference with working memory capacity

Candice C. Morey*, Emily M. Elliott, Jody Wiggers, Sharon D. Eaves, Jill T. Shelton, Jonathan T. Mall

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Relationships between Stroop interference and working memory capacity may reflect individual differences in resolving conflict, susceptibility to goal neglect, or both of these factors. We compared relationships between working memory capacity and three Stroop tasks: a classic, printed color-word Stroop task, a cross-modal Stroop, and a new version of cross-modal Stroop with a concurrent auditory monitoring component. Each of these tasks showed evidence of interference between the semantic meaning of the color word and the to-be-named color, suggesting these tasks each require resolution of interference. However, only Stroop interference in the print-based task with high proportions of congruent trials correlated significantly with working memory capacity. This evidence suggests that the relationships observed between Stroop interference and working memory capacity are primarily driven by individual differences in the propensity to actively maintain a goal. (C) 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)250-260
Number of pages11
JournalActa Psychologica
Volume141
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2012

Keywords

  • ACCESS
  • INTELLIGENCE
  • Goal-neglect
  • Working memory
  • INDIVIDUAL-DIFFERENCES
  • TASK
  • Selective attention
  • SELECTIVE ATTENTION
  • Executive control
  • Stroop
  • PERFORMANCE
  • FACILITATION

Cite this