Google Trends terms reporting rhinitis and related topics differ in European countries

Jean Bousquet, Ioana Agache, Josep M Anto, Karl C Bergmann, Claus Bachert, Isabella Annesi-Maesano, Philippe J Bousquet, Gennaro D'Amato, Pascal Demoly, Govert De Vries, Esben Eller, Wytske Fokkens, Joao Fonseca, Tari Haahtela, Peter W Hellings, Jocelyne Just, Thomas Keil, Ludger Klimek, Piotr Kuna, Karin C Lodrup CarlsenRalf Mösges, Ruth Murray, Kristof Nekam, Gabrielle Onorato, Nikos G Papadopoulos, Boleslaw Samolinski, Peter Schmid-Grendelmeier, Michel Thibaudon, Peter Tomazic, Massimo Triggiani, Arunas Valiulis, Erkka Valovirta, Michiel Van Eerd, Magnus Wickman, Torsten Zuberbier, Aziz Sheikh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Google Trends (GT) searches trends of specific queries in Google and reflects the real-life epidemiology of allergic rhinitis. We compared Google Trends terms related to allergy and rhinitis in all European Union countries, Norway and Switzerland from January 1, 2011 to December 20, 2016. The aim was to assess whether the same terms could be used to report the seasonal variations of allergic diseases. Using the Google Trend 5-year graph, an annual and clear seasonality of queries was found in all countries apart from Cyprus, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania and Malta. Different terms were found to demonstrate seasonality depending on the country - namely: "hay fever"; "allergy"; and "pollen" - showing cultural differences. A single set of terms cannot be used across all European countries, but allergy seasonality can be compared across Europe providing the above three terms are used. Using longitudinal data in different countries and multiple terms, we identified an awareness-related spike of searches (December 2016). This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1261-1266
JournalAllergy
Volume72
Issue number8
Early online date13 Mar 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2017

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