Grains of truth or transparent blindfolds? A review of current debates in archaeological phytolith analysis

Lisa Shillito

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Phytolith analysis has become an increasingly popular archaeobotanical tool in the past few decades. Phytoliths have been used to support key hypotheses relating to the domestication of several food crops and in the study of ancient diet, and they are of particular importance in contexts where other plant remains are poorly preserved. However, the discipline has also been subject to controversy and debate. This paper gives an overview of the technique and three key case studies covering a range of geographical areas. Some of the problems that are common to each are discussed and suggestions are made for how these problems could be resolved in future research. It is suggested that further caution should be taken during interpretation, and a greater consideration given to taphonomy. Despite these criticisms it is concluded that there is still much potential in the technique, particularly when integrated with other lines of microarchaeological evidence.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)71-82
Number of pages12
JournalVegetation history and archaeobotany
Volume22
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2013

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