Has adaptation occurred in males and females since separate sexes evolved in the plant Silene latifolia?

Niklaus Zemp, Alex Widmer, Deborah Charlesworth

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The evolution of separate sexes may involve changed expression of many genes, as each sex adapts to its new state. Evidence is accumulating for sex differences in expression even in organisms that have recently evolved separate sexes from hermaphrodite or monoecious (cosexual) ancestors, such as some dioecious flowering plants. We describe evidence that a dioecious plant species with recently evolved dioecy, Silene latifolia, has undergone adaptive changes that improve functioning in females, in addition to changes that are probably pleiotropic effects of male sterility. The results suggest pervasive adaptations as soon as males and females evolve from their cosexual ancestor.

Original languageEnglish
Number of pages8
JournalProceedings of the Royal Society B-Biological Sciences
Volume285
Issue number1883
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 25 Jul 2018

Keywords

  • gene expression
  • dioecy
  • hermaphrodite
  • sexually antagonistic selection
  • flower development

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