Health economics education in undergraduate medical degrees: an assessment of curricula content and student knowledge

Ewan Gray, Paula K. Lorgelly*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Methods: Semi-structured interviews with senior teaching staff in three Medical Schools, a review of course documentation, and an online survey to assess student knowledge. The survey was scored and mean scores were compared across medical schools, year of study, and teaching components, including the professional background of the teachers.

Results: There was considerable diversity across the medical schools in terms of the content of the health economics education, and in the way that the learning was structured and delivered. Student knowledge was found to vary across medical schools; the school with the most intensive health economics curricula was found to perform marginally better. Students who were taught by health economists scored higher than those who were taught by other professions.

Conclusion: The teaching and learning environment and level of student knowledge of health economics was found to differ considerably across medical schools. The delivery of health economics teaching by specialised health economists would appear to be one possible strategy to improve student knowledge.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)392-399
Number of pages8
JournalMedical Teacher
Volume32
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 27 Apr 2010

Keywords

  • SCIENCE EDUCATION
  • SOCIAL-SCIENCE
  • LAW

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Health economics education in undergraduate medical degrees: an assessment of curricula content and student knowledge'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this