Health screening, cardiometabolic disease and adverse health outcomes in individuals with severe mental illness

Robert Pearsall, Richard J Shaw, Gary McLean, Moira Connolly, Kate A Hughes, James G Boyle, John Park, Daniel J Smith, Daniel Mackay

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract / Description of output

BACKGROUND: Poor physical health in severe mental illness (SMI) remains a major issue for clinical practice.

AIMS: To use electronic health records of routinely collected clinical data to determine levels of screening for cardiometabolic disease and adverse health outcomes in a large sample (n = 7718) of patients with SMI, predominantly schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

METHOD: We linked data from the Glasgow Psychosis Clinical Information System (PsyCIS) to morbidity records, routine blood results and prescribing data.

RESULTS: There was no record of routine blood monitoring during the preceding 2 years for 16.9% of the cohort. However, monitoring was poorer for male patients, younger patients aged 16-44, those with schizophrenia, and for tests of cholesterol, triglyceride and glycosylated haemoglobin. We estimated that 8.0% of participants had diabetes and that lipids levels, and use of lipid-lowering medication, was generally high.

CONCLUSIONS: Electronic record linkage identified poor health screening and adverse health outcomes in this vulnerable patient group. This approach can inform the design of future interventions and health policy.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)e97
JournalBJPsych Open
Volume5
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 8 Nov 2019

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