Henry Raeburn’s Portraits of Distant Sons in the Global British Empire

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Abstract

Henry Raeburn, a major late eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century British artist, has received insufficient critical scrutiny. His little-known group of portraits of the Fraser family of Reelig is dominated by representations of the adolescent male sons. In the context of this Scottish Highland family’s temporal and geographic dislocation around the British Empire, these portraits were both present and prescient. As a fundamental expectation of portraiture, likeness was the dominant affective category in the lived reality of the British Empire.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)294-311
Number of pages18
JournalArt Bulletin
Volume95
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2013

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