Higher Arm Versus Lower Arm Systolic Blood Pressure and Cardiovascular Outcomes: a Meta-Analysis of Individual Participant Data From the INTERPRESS-IPD Collaboration

Christopher E Clark, Fiona C Warren, Kate Boddy, Sinéad T J McDonagh, Sarah F Moore, Maria Teresa Alzamora, Rafel Ramos Blanes, Shao-Yuan Chuang, Michael H Criqui, Marie Dahl, Gunnar Engström, Raimund Erbel, Mark Espeland, Luigi Ferrucci, Maëlenn Guerchet, Andrew Hattersley, Carlos Lahoz, Robyn L McClelland, Mary M McDermott, Jackie PriceHenri E Stoffers, Ji-Guang Wang, Jan Westerink, James White, Lyne Cloutier, Rod S Taylor, Angela C Shore, Richard J McManus, Victor Aboyans, John L Campbell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Guidelines recommend measuring blood pressure (BP) in both arms, adopting the higher arm readings for diagnosis and management. Data to support this recommendation are lacking. We evaluated associations of higher and lower arm systolic BPs with diagnostic and treatment thresholds, and prognosis in hypertension, using data from the Inter-arm Blood Pressure Difference-Individual Participant Data Collaboration.

METHODS: One-stage multivariable Cox regression models, stratified by study, were used to examine associations of higher or lower reading arm BPs with cardiovascular mortality, all-cause mortality, and cardiovascular events, in individual participant data meta-analyses pooled from 23 cohorts. Cardiovascular events were modelled for Framingham and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease risk scores. Model fit was compared throughout using Akaike information criteria. Proportions reclassified across guideline recommended intervention thresholds were also compared.

RESULTS: We analyzed 53 172 participants: mean age 60 years; 48% female. Higher arm BP, compared with lower arm, reclassified 12% of participants at either 130 or 140 mm Hg systolic BP thresholds (both P<0.001). Higher arm BP models fitted better for all-cause mortality, cardiovascular mortality, and cardiovascular events (all P<0.001). Higher arm BP models better predicted cardiovascular events with Framingham and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease risk scores (both P<0.001) and reclassified 4.6% and 3.5% of participants respectively to higher risk categories compared with lower arm BPs).

CONCLUSIONS: Using BP from higher instead of lower reading arms reclassified 12% of people over thresholds used to diagnose hypertension. All prediction models performed better when using the higher arm BP. Both arms should be measured for accurate diagnosis and management of hypertension.

REGISTRATION: URL: https://www.

CLINICALTRIALS: gov; Unique identifier: CRD42015031227.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2328-2335
JournalHypertension
Volume79
Issue number10
Early online date2 Aug 2022
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2022

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