HIV discrimination: Integrating the results from a six-country situational analysis in the Asia Pacific

Daniel D. Reidpath, K. Y. Chan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The findings of the six independent studies on institutional forms of HIV discrimination in the Asia Pacific presented in this Special Issue of AIDS Care are integrated. At first glance, the general pattern of the results across the study sites suggests that discrimination is most pertinent in the domain of 'practice' rather than in the domains of law or institutional policy. On closer analysis, however, utilising the qualitative data, this conclusion does not take sufficient account of the cultural context within which the interpersonal interaction (practice) between the health carers and people living with HIV/AIDS occurs. Limitations on the use of anti-discrimination legislations and protective written policies for reducing discrimination in these contexts are discussed. The need for alternative approaches to thinking about discrimination intervention is raised and this is done through a consideration of the strategy of universal precautions.

Original languageEnglish
JournalAIDS Care - Psychological and Socio-Medical Aspects of AIDS/HIV
Volume17
Issue numberSUPPL. 2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Nov 2005

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