How Hard Can It Be? Designing and Implementing a Deployable Multipath TCP

Costin Raiciu, Christoph Paasch, Sebastien Barre, Alan Ford, Michio Honda, Fabien Duchene, Olivier Bonaventure, Mark Handley

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Networks have become multipath: mobile devices have multiple radio interfaces, datacenters have redundant paths and multihoming is the norm for big server farms. Meanwhile, TCP is still only single-path.

Is it possible to extend TCP to enable it to support multiple paths for current applications on today’s Intenet? The answer is positive. We carefully review the constraints—partly due to various types of middleboxes—that influenced the design of Multipath TCP and show how we handled them to achieve its deployability goals.

We report our experience in implementing MultipathTCP in the Linux kernel and we evaluate its performance. Our measurements focus on the algorithms needed to efficiently use paths with different characteristics, notably send and receive buffer tuning and segment reordering. We also compare the performance of our implementation with regular TCP on web servers. Finally, we discuss the lessons learned from designing MPTCP.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication9th USENIX Symposium on Networked Systems Design and Implementation (NSDI 12)
Place of PublicationSan Jose, CA
PublisherUSENIX Association
Pages399-412
Number of pages14
ISBN (Print)978-931971-92-8
Publication statusPublished - 27 Apr 2012
Event9th USENIX Symposium on Networked Systems Design and Implementation - San Jose, United States
Duration: 25 Apr 201227 Apr 2012
Conference number: 9
https://www.usenix.org/conference/nsdi12

Symposium

Symposium9th USENIX Symposium on Networked Systems Design and Implementation
Abbreviated titleNSDI 2012
CountryUnited States
CitySan Jose
Period25/04/1227/04/12
Internet address

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