How lay health workers tailor in effective health behaviour change interventions: A protocol for a systematic review

Faith Hodgins, Wendy Gnich, Alastair J. Ross, Andrea Sherriff, Heather Worlledge-Andrew

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Lay health workers (LHWs) are utilised as a channel of delivery in many health interventions. While they have no formal professional training related to their role, they utilise their connections with the target group or community in order to reach individuals who would not normally readily engage with health services. Lay health worker programmes are often based on psychological theories of behaviour change that point to ‘tailoring to individuals’ needs or characteristics’ as key to success. Although lay health workers have been shown to be effective in many contexts, there is, as yet, little clarity when it comes to how LHWs assess individuals’ needs in order to tailor their interventions. This study aims to develop a better understanding of the effective implementation of tailoring in lay health worker interventions by appraising evidence and synthesising studies that report evaluations of tailored interventions.
Original languageEnglish
JournalSystematic Reviews
Volume5
Issue number102
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 16 Jun 2016

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