How pictures in picture storybooks support young children's story comprehension: An eye-tracking experiment

Zsofia K. Takacs*, Adriana G. Bus

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

In a within-participant design, 41 children (mean age = 64 months, range = 50–81) listened to brief stories in four conditions. Written text was present on the screen in all conditions (similar to the typical storybook experience) but combined with other sources of information: (a) only oral narration, (b) oral narration and a picture that was congruent with the narration, (c) oral narration and an incongruent picture, and (d) only a picture but no oral narration. Children's eye movements while looking at the screen were recorded with an eye-tracker. An important finding was that a congruent picture contributed substantially to children's story retellings, more so than a picture that was incongruent with the narration. The eye-tracking data showed that children explored pictures in a way that they could maximally integrate the narration and the picture. Consequences for interactive reading and picture storybook format are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-12
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Experimental Child Psychology
Volume174
Early online date29 May 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2018

Keywords

  • dual coding
  • experiment
  • eye-tracking
  • kindergarten
  • multimedia learning
  • picture storybooks

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