Human agency beliefs affect interaction behaviours and task performance when learning with computerised partners

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Computer-mediated systems can support aging in-place, although little is known about how older adults interact with these systems and how they learn from them. Using a Wizard-of-Oz paradigm, this study compared how older adults interacted and learned with a system that they believed was a human, and with a system they believed was a computer. While both systems were identical, the human system used natural speech and the computer system used synthetic speech. In a within-subjects design, twenty-four older adults aged 60-85 years completed a collaborative learning task with both the human and computer systems. The task involved negotiating and learning referential labels for abstract tangram shapes. A learning effect was observed in both conditions. However, participants took longer to complete the task when they believed they were interacting with a computer, were less accurate in their answers, changed their answers more, and recalled them with less detail after a delay, compared to when they believed they were interacting with a human. These findings suggest that beliefs about agency affect how efficiently and how accurately older adults learn with technology, which has implications for computer mediated support in aging.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)60-67
JournalComputers in Human Behavior
Volume101
Early online date6 Jul 2019
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2019

Keywords

  • aging
  • social interaction
  • learning
  • memory
  • collaborative learning

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