I expect it to be great... but will it be? An investigation of outcomes and mediators of a school-based mentoring program

David Laco, Wendy Johnson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Despite their growing popularity, quantitative studies of school-based mentoring (SBM) programs for youth have showed considerable variation in mentoring benefits, including negative effects of mentoring. We investigated the initial 3 months of one school’s SBM program, delivered by teachers and compulsory for all first- and second-year high school students (N = 103). Students who reported higher quality of mentoring environment (QME) tended to report greater school engagement. No such association was found for grades. In addition, higher QME was associated with greater perceived benefits of discussing personal themes but not of academic themes. Evidence of personal benefit, but absence of evidence for academic benefit, was consistent with reported effects in other SBM programs. Protégé expectations, but not gender or initial school engagement, were associated with QME, suggesting self-fulfilling prophecy as a mediator of effects. We discuss the implications of this for managing SBM programs and future research.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-27
JournalYouth and Society
Early online date7 Jun 2017
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 7 Jun 2017

Keywords

  • youth mentoring
  • school-based programs
  • school engagement
  • self-fulfilling prophecy
  • student expectations

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'I expect it to be great... but will it be? An investigation of outcomes and mediators of a school-based mentoring program'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this