Identification of immunologically relevant proteins of Chlamydophila abortus using sera from experimentally infected pregnant ewes (Clinical and Vaccine Immunology (2010) 17, 8, (1274-1281))

P. X. Marques, Puneet Souda, J. O'Donovan, J. Gutierrez, E. J. Williams, S. Worrall, M. McElroy, A. Proctor, C. Brady, D. Sammin, H. F. Basset, Julian P. Whitelegge, B. E. Markey, J. E. Nally

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debatepeer-review

Abstract / Description of output

Chlamydophila abortus is an intracellular pathogen and the etiological agent of enzootic abortion of ewes (EAE). C. abortus has a biphasic development cycle; extracellular infectious elementary bodies (EB) attach and penetrate host cells, where they give rise to intracellular, metabolically active reticulate bodies (RB). RB divide by binary fission and subsequently mature to EB, which, on rupture of infected cells, are released to infect new host cells. Pregnant ewes were challenged with 2 × 106 inclusion forming units (IFU) of C. abortus cultured in yolk sac (comprising both EB and RB). Serum samples were collected at 0, 7, 14, 21, 27, 30, 35, 40, and 43 days postinfection (dpi) and used to identify antigens of C. abortus expressed during disease. Additionally, sera from fetal lambs were collected at 30, 35, 40, and 43 dpi. All serum samples collected from experimentally infected pregnant ewes reacted specifically with several antigens of EB as determined by one-dimensional (1-D) and 2-D gel electrophoresis; reactive antigens identified by mass spectrometry included the major outer membrane protein (MOMP), polymorphic outer membrane protein (POMP), and macrophage infectivity potentiator (MIP) lipoprotein.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1491-1491
Number of pages1
JournalClinical and Vaccine Immunology
Volume17
Issue number9
Early online date16 Jun 2010
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Sept 2010

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