Identification of Salmonella enterica Serovar Dublin-Specific Sequences by Subtractive Hybridization and Analysis of Their Role in Intestinal Colonization and Systemic Translocation in Cattle

Gillian D. Pullinger, Francis Dziva, Bryan Charleston, Timothy S. Wallis, Mark P. Stevens

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract / Description of output

Salmonella enterica serovar Dublin is a host-restricted serovar associated with typhoidal disease in cattle. In contrast, the fowl-associated serovar S. enterica serovar Gallinarum is avirulent in calves, yet it invades ileal mucosa and induces enteritis at levels comparable to those induced by S. enterica serovar Dublin. Suppression subtractive hybridization was employed to identify S. enterica serovar Dublin strain SD3246 genes absent from S. enterica serovar Gallinarum strain SG9. Forty-one S. enterica serovar Dublin fragments were cloned and sequenced. Among these, 24 mobile-element-associated genes were identified, and 12 clones exhibited similarity with sequences of known or predicted function in other serovars. Three S. enterica serovar Dublin-specific regions were homologous to regions from the genome of Enterobacter sp. strain 638. Sequencing of fragments adjacent to these three sequences revealed the presence of a 21-kb genomic island, designated S. enterica serovar Dublin island 1 (SDI-1). PCR analysis and Southern blotting showed that SDI-1 is highly conserved within S. enterica serovar Dublin isolates but rarely found in other serovars. To probe the role of genes identified by subtractive hybridization in vivo, 24 signature-tagged S. enterica serovar Dublin SD3246 mutants lacking loci not present in Salmonella serovar Gallinarum SG9 were created and screened by oral challenge of cattle. Though attenuation of tagged SG9 and SD3246 Salmonella pathogenicity island-1 (SPI-1) and SPI-2 mutant strains was detected, no obvious defects of these 24 mutants were detected. Subsequently, a Delta SDI-1 mutant was found to exhibit weak but significant attenuation compared with the parent strain in coinfection of calves. SDI-1 mutation did not impair invasion, intramacrophage survival, or virulence in mice, implying that SDI-1 does not influence fitness per se and may act in a host-specific manner.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)5310-5321
Number of pages12
JournalInfection and Immunity
Volume76
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2008

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Identification of Salmonella enterica Serovar Dublin-Specific Sequences by Subtractive Hybridization and Analysis of Their Role in Intestinal Colonization and Systemic Translocation in Cattle'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this